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Review Article

Implication of Social Rejection in Cognitive Bias Modification Interpretation Training in Adolescents With Eating Disorders

Youl-Ri Kim, Sohee Lee, and Yeon-Sun Cho

J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):101-106

Objectives: Difficulties in interpersonal relationships intensify negative emotions and act as risk and maintenance factors for eating pathology in eating disorders. Rejection sensitivity refers to the tendency to react sensitively to a rejection. Patients with eating disorders experience difficulties in interpersonal relationships because of their high sensitivity to rejection. Cognitive bias modification interpretation (CBM-I) is a treatment developed to correct interpretation bias for social and emotional stimuli. In this review, we searched for research characteristics and trends through a systematic literature analysis of CBM-I for eating disorders.
Methods: Five papers that met the selection and exclusion criteria were included in the final literature review and analyzed according to detailed topics (participant characteristics, design, and results).
Results: The literature supports the efficacy of the CBM-I in reducing negative interpretation bias and eating disorder psychopathology in patients with eating disorders. CBM-I targets emotional dysregulation in adolescent patients with eating disorders and serves as an additional strengthening psychotherapy to alleviate eating disorder symptoms.
Conclusion: The current findings highlight the potential of CBM-I as an individualized adjunctive treatment for adolescents with eating disorders and social functioning problems.
Key Words: Eating disorders; Rejection sensitivity; Interpretation bias; Cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I); Adolescent
Review Article

A Systematic Review on the Mental Health Status of Patients Infected With Monkeypox Virus

Anila Jaleel, Ghulam Farid, Haleema Irfan et al.

J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):107-118

Objectives: This study aims to extract and summarize the literature on the mental health status of patients with monkeypox.
Methods: This review was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines using different databases and publishers such as Scopus, Sage, ScienceDirect, PubMed, BMJ, Wiley Online Library, Wolters Kluwer OVID-SP, and Google Scholar. The literature review was based on monkeypox and mental health. The year of publication was 2021–2023, during the monkeypox disease period. Data were extracted from opinions, editorials, empirical studies, and surveys.
Results: Based on the literature related to the mental status of patients with monkeypox, the following themes and subthemes were identified: anxiety and depression, self-harm and suicidal tendencies, neuropsychiatric symptoms, mental health, social stigma, sex workers, vaccination, and stress-related diseases.
Conclusion: A review of monkeypox virus infection studies reveals that 25%–50% of patients experience anxiety and depression due to isolation, boredom, and loneliness. Factors such as infected people, a lack of competence among healthcare professionals, and shame over physical symptoms exacerbate mental insults. The implications of society include increased self-harm, suicide, low productivity, fear of stigmatization, and transmission of infection.
Key Words: Monkeypox; Mental stress; Anxiety; Depression; Suicide
Original Article

Analyzing Co-Occurrence of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury With Suicidal Ideation and Related Factors Among Adolescents in Jeju Island

Duk-Soo Moon, Un-Sun Chung, Young Sook Kwack et al.

J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):119-126

Objectives: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behavior, including suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempts, are important predictors of suicide in adolescents. This study aimed to investigate the associations between NSSI, SI, NSSI+SI, mental health problems, and family factors in Korean adolescents in Jeju Island, with an emphasis on key findings.
Methods: A total of 561 adolescents completed self-report questionnaires regarding demographics, NSSI, SI, suicidal behavior, perceived family functioning, and mental health problems, which were assessed using Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children, Screen for Children Anxiety-Related Disorders (SCARED), and Youth Self-Report (YSR). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, chi-square test, post-hoc analyses, and multivariate logistic regression.
Results: In this study, 22.3% of adolescents reported either NSSI or SI, with 5.5% reporting NSSI and 20.7% reporting SI. Combined (NSSI+SI) group showed a significantly higher SCARED score, anxiety/depression, thought problems, attention problem, and rule breaking on YSR than did the SI only group. Higher level of depression and anxiety were significantly associated with NSSI and SI. Female sex and perceived family dissatisfaction were significantly associated factors for SI, but not for NSSI in multivariate logistic regression.
Conclusion: This study provides insights into the clinical characteristics and associated factors among adolescents with NSSI, SI, and NSSI+SI in Jeju Island. Identifying these results can inform the development of targeted prevention and intervention strategies to mitigate the negative consequences of these behaviors and contribute to a better understanding of the role of family in this context.
Key Words: Non-suicidal self-injury; Suicidal ideation; Family relations; Adolescents
Original Article

Comparing Ruminative and Distracting Responses and Emotion Regulation Difficulties in Early Community Adolescents With and Without Self-Harm

Yeontaek Oh, Cheolgyu Shin, Jonggook Lee et al.

J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):127-135

Objectives: This study aimed to compare the demographic characteristics, responses to negative emotions, and difficulties in emotion regulation between self-harming adolescents and control individuals aged 12–14 years from the community.
Methods: Data were collected from adolescents in Chungcheong Province, South Korea, between September 2021 and November 2022. Demographic characteristics and responses to the Depressed Mood Questionnaire and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale-16 (DERS-16) were compared between the self-harm and control groups.
Results: The self-harm group exhibited a higher prevalence of child abuse (odds ratio [OR]=4.787, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.591–14.409, p=0.005) and school bullying victimization (OR=4.495, 95% CI=2.353–8.588, p<0.001) than those in the control group. The selfharm group displayed higher levels of rumination (t=7.88, p<0.001) and reduced distraction responses (reverse score t=2.25, p=0.025) than those of the control group. Additionally, the self-harm group scored higher on all subscales and the total DERS-16 score (t=7.61, p<0.001).
Conclusion: Interventions for self-harming adolescents should address child abuse and bullying victimization. Prevention programs for self-harming adolescents should focus on reducing rumination responses, increasing distractive responses, and addressing difficulties in emotion regulation using dialectical behavior therapy-skill training.
Key Words: Deliberate self-harm; Adolescents; Rumination; Distraction; Emotion regulation
Original Article

Examining the Use of Oral Aripiprazole in Patients With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Study of Retrospective Chart Review at a University Medical Center

Jae Hyun Han, Jong Myeong Kim, and Hee Jeong Yoo

J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):136-142

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the patterns of use of oral aripiprazole treatment in children and adolescents diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at a university medical center in Korea.
Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 164 outpatient children and adolescents diagnosed with ASD by child and adolescent psychiatrists. Patient demographic characteristics, clinical features, age and dose of aripiprazole treatment, associated adverse events, and concomitant medications, etc. were evaluated.
Results: Aripiprazole treatment was initiated at a mean age of 7.64 years, at a mean initial dose of 1.15 mg. Methylphenidate was often co-administered with aripiprazole. The most commonly reported adverse effects were increased appetite and weight gain, which in some cases led to discontinuation of medication.
Conclusion: A follow-up study is warranted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole treatment in Korean children and adolescents diagnosed with ASD, and it is crucial to consider their clinical characteristics and response to treatment in the evaluation.
Key Words: Autism spectrum disorder; Aripiprazole; Children; Adolescents
Original Article

Efficacy of Learning Disorder Treatment for Reading or Mathematics Disorders: An Open Study

Hyunju Lee, Inhye Song, Woo Young Kim et al.

J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):143-149

Objectives: This study aimed to identify the effectiveness of treatment programs for children with reading (RD) or mathematics disorders (MD). Structured treatment programs were developed to improve phonological awareness and number sense among children and adolescents with RD or MD, respectively, and the effectiveness of the learning disorder treatment programs were evaluated.
Methods: We used standardized, objective diagnostic, and evaluation tools not only to recruit participants with RD, MD, or comorbid attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, but also to assess the effectiveness of the treatments regarding both improved core neurocognitive deficits of RD or MD and academic achievement. Forty children with RD or MD received one-on-one treatments from therapists.
Results: In the RD group, treatment effects were observed in all subtests. In the word and paragraph reading tests, the accuracy rates and fluency improved. The results of the phonological working memory test, word–sound correspondence test, and rapid automatic naming tests also improved. In the MD group, the accuracy rate and fluency on the arithmetic test improved. An increase in the accuracy rate in the size and distance comparison tests and a decrease in the error rate in the estimation test were also observed. However, there were no improvements in reaction time in these subtests.
Conclusion: Learning disorder treatment programs that focus on improving phonological awareness or number sense in children with RD or MD improved achievement, phonological awareness, and number sense.
Key Words: Reading disorder; Mathematics disorders; Specific learning disorder; Dyslexia; Dyscalculia; Learning disorder treatment
Corrigendum

Assessment Methods for Problematic Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Miji Lee, Seolha Lee, Jong-Woo Sohn et al.

J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):150-150

CURRENT ISSUE
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):101-50
Review Articles
Implication of Social Rejection in Cognitive Bias Modification Interpretation Training in Adolescents With Eating Disorders
Youl-Ri Kim, Sohee Lee, and Yeon-Sun Cho
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):101-106
A Systematic Review on the Mental Health Status of Patients Infected With Monkeypox Virus
Anila Jaleel, Ghulam Farid, Haleema Irfan, Khalid Mahmood, and Saeeda Baig
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):107-118
Original Articles
Analyzing Co-Occurrence of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury With Suicidal Ideation and Related Factors Among Adolescents in Jeju Island
Duk-Soo Moon, Un-Sun Chung, Young Sook Kwack, Bung-Nyun Kim, and Na Ri Kang
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):119-126
Comparing Ruminative and Distracting Responses and Emotion Regulation Difficulties in Early Community Adolescents With and Without Self-Harm
Yeontaek Oh, Cheolgyu Shin, Jonggook Lee, Keun Oh, Heeyoung Seo, Seungwon Chung, and Je Jung Lee
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):127-135
Examining the Use of Oral Aripiprazole in Patients With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Study of Retrospective Chart Review at a University Medical Center
Jae Hyun Han, Jong Myeong Kim, and Hee Jeong Yoo
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):136-142
Efficacy of Learning Disorder Treatment for Reading or Mathematics Disorders: An Open Study
Hyunju Lee, Inhye Song, Woo Young Kim, Hannah Huh, Eun Kyoung Lee, Jaesuk Jung, Cheon Seok Suh, and Hanik Yoo
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):143-149
Corrigendum
Assessment Methods for Problematic Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Miji Lee, Seolha Lee, Jong-Woo Sohn, Ki Woo Kim, and Hyung Jin Choi
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2024;35(2):150-150
Journal of the Korean Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry) covers the whole range of child and adolescent psychiatry and neuroscience. It also seeks to promote the well-being of children and families by publishing scholarly ...
 
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Received March 10, 2022; Accepted May 24, 2022.
Stimulant Induced Movement Disorders in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
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Clinical Characteristics of Adolescents Hospitalized Through Emergency Room for Intentional Self-Harm or Suicide Attempts
Tae Yeon Yoon, Hyun Sook Lee, Jung-Woo Son, Sang Mi Kim, and Je Jung Lee
Received March 2, 2022; Accepted May 10, 2022.