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The Influence of Depression and School Life on the Quality of Life of Korean Child and Adolescent Patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Comparison of the Perspectives of the Patients and Their Caregivers
J Korean Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry
Published online November 30, 2018
© 2018 Korean Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Byeong-Eon Park, Jeong-Seop Lee, Hee-Yun Kim, Jae-Nam Bae, Won-Hyoung Kim, Hye-Young Kim, Mi-Roo Rim, Sang-Gu Kang, and Seo-Hyun Choi

Department of Psychiatry, University of Inha College of Medicine, Inha Medical Center, Incheon, Korea
Correspondence to: Jeong-Seop Lee, Department of Psychiatry, University of Inha College of Medicine, Inha Medical Center, 27 Inhang-ro, Jung-gu, Incheon 22332, Korea
Tel: +82-32-890-3477, Fax: +82-32-890-3536, E-mail: soulfree@inha.ac.kr
Received August 16, 2018; Revised August 30, 2018; Accepted September 3, 2018.
Abstract
Objectives: This study aimed to compare the quality of life reported by patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to the patients’ quality of life as reported by their caregivers. In addition, it aimed to examine how emotional problems, including depression and anxiety, and the severity of the symptoms affect the quality of life reported by the patients and their caregivers.
Methods: The patients’ quality of life and their degree of depression and anxiety were measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Child Self-Report, the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI), and the Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale, respectively. The caregivers’ perception of the patients’ quality of life and severity of the ADHD symptoms were measured using the PedsQL 4.0 Parent Proxy Report and the Conners’ Parent Rating Scale (CPRS), respectively. A total of 66 participants completed the survey. The independent-samples t-test, Pearson’s correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis were conducted.
Results: The mean score of the PedsQL 4.0 Child Self-Report was significantly higher than the mean score of the PedsQL 4.0 Parent Proxy Report. However, for school function, the PedsQL 4.0 Child Self-Report score was significantly lower than that of Parent Proxy Report. The correlation between the PedsQL 4.0 Child Self-Report and PedsQL 4.0 Parent Proxy Report scores was significant only for emotional function and social function. The multiple regression analysis showed that the PedsQL 4.0 Child Self-Report and PedsQL 4.0 Parent Proxy Report scores were significantly predicted by the CDI and CPRS scores, respectively.
Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that there are clear differences between the quality of life reported by the patient themselves and that reported by their caregivers. In addition, the findings suggest that it is critical to treat the patients’ accompanying depressive symptoms.
Keywords : Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Quality of life, Depression; Anxiety, School function.


October 2018, 29 (4)
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